What Happened to Scheshko?

Amy at Brotmanblog: A Family Journey asked how the surname Scheshko became Castle. I thought that I had explained that in a previous post, but I cannot find that I mentioned it.

After Murray and Diana moved from NYC to Michigan with their two children, Murray decided to change their last name. You can see what the petition states as to the reason. It fits exactly with what the gardener always told me about the name change.

“The name Scheshko has caused embarassment to myself and my family. People have a hard time remembering the name and a hard time pronouncing it.”

What the petition doesn’t state is how Murray arrived at the name Castle.

He picked it out of a phone book, or so the story goes.

I did “redact” the names and birth dates of the gardener and his sister from the document.

Here are the two pieces of text I removed!

at Palmer Lake, Michigan

first home after NYC, before the name change in Kalamazoo

23 thoughts on “What Happened to Scheshko?

  1. So the gardener was aware of the name change. How did he feel about it? Is there any connection between the meaning of Scheshko and Castle or just a random selection? And do you really think that that was the only reason he changed the name—it wasn’t due to anti-Semitism or xenophobia?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Sharon! You would be amazed how many people volunteer that they love the name Castle! It seems to resonate with people as a surname. We say we live at Casa Castle haha. For me it was a little strange because I grew up with a name that was made up of a lot of straight soldier consonants (both first and last names), so adding a curling C after Luanne felt weird to me LOL.
      They are a couple of cuties in that photo.

      Like

  2. Interesting. I don’t think it’s a difficult name to spell or remember. I had some friend of Polish origin and their last names were impossible. There were composed of the less frequent consonants (like x, z, j, q, etc.) punctuated with an occasional vowel. Castle would be easier though.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. The Squire’s family name was originally Rhys, which is Welsh. Someplace along the line it was changed to Rice, but even as simply as that is, it gets gebozzled. Rush, Ruth, Rouse. . . My sister wanted me to pick up an Australian flag for her, but when I went after it, the clerk couldn’t find it. “Did she perhaps order it under my name?” The clerk went and looked, and then the manager, an older man, had a go. He came out chuckling. “You’ll never guess how this was listed.”

    Fannie Brice.

    Liked by 1 person

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